FAQs

The FAQ sections below provide responses to our most commonly asked questions. All applicants should review the How to Apply page for full application details.

FAQ Page

Admissions and COVID-19

*Please note that this page will be updated as the situation evolves.*

Last Updated: April 3, 2020

I am enrolled in a prerequisite course right now and the term has been disrupted due to the COVID-19 situation. My school has decided to make the course pass/ fail (credit/ no credit). Can I still use the course to satisfy the prerequisite?

Yes. Half courses taken in the winter 2020 term (and full year courses taken Fall 2019 – Winter 2020) will be accepted towards prerequisites with a minimum grade of “pass” or “credit” or, if your school is still using a letter/numerical grade, with a B-/70%. Any course taken outside of this time frame, must still meet the B-/70% grade minimum in order to be used towards a prerequisite.

My school has decided to make my winter 2020 courses into pass/ fail (credit/ no credit). Will these courses still be applied towards my sub-GPA?

No. Courses that are pass/ fail (credit/ no credit) are not counted towards the sub-GPA calculations. 

I applied to the MScPT program in January 2020. I am currently enrolled in my final term of my undergraduate degree and I was on track to graduate in June 2020. My graduation date has been moved back to November 2020. Will my application still be considered?

For the 2020 (current) application cycle only:

  • If your convocation has been moved from June 2020 to November 2020, you will need to make sure that ORPAS has received a current transcript AND an official letter from your registrar indicating that you have completed all degree requirements. These must be received by ORPAS by June 30, 2020
  • If your convocation is scheduled for June 2020, you will still need to make sure that ORPAS receives your final transcript indicating degree conferral by June 30, 2020.
  • If you cannot finish your degree requirements in time for ORPAS to receive the required documents (see above – transcript and registrar’s letter or final transcript) by June 30, you will not be eligible for admission and should consider re-applying next year.

 

Applying

How can I apply to the physical therapy program?
Applications are available from ORPAS, a division of the Ontario Universities Application Centre (OUAC). Visit ORPAS and click on the ORPAS Online Application link.

Do I need to have my undergraduate degree finished to apply?
Applicants must be able to forward a final transcript showing that their undergraduate degree has been conferred by the end of June, prior to the September start date. Applicants who are not able to meet this requirement are advised to apply the following year.

If my undergraduate degree will be conferred in the fall that the MScPT program starts, can I still apply?
No, applicants must be able to forward a final transcript showing that their undergraduate degree has been conferred by the end of June, prior to the September start date. 

Do I need to take the MCAT or GRE?
No.

I’ve completed graduate level degree work. How will my application be considered?
Graduate applicants are generally considered in the exact same manner as undergraduate applicants. While you should include your graduate program in the ORPAS application and send a graduate transcript to ORPAS, please note that the sub-GPA that ORPAS calculates will not includes grades from graduate level coursework. The Department will consider graduate level coursework and update your sub-GPA ranking. 

I’m a mature applicant. How will my application be considered?
The same application and selection process is used for all applicants.

When does the application to the physical therapy program at U of T open?
Applications are generally available on the Ontario Rehabilitation Sciences Programs Application Service (ORPAS) website by mid-October of each year. Applications are typically due in early January but the exact date varies from one year to the next. Applicants are expected to be fully aware of all important dates and deadlines.

When are applications due?
Applications are typically due in early January but the exact date varies from one year to the next. Applicants are expected to be fully aware of all important dates and deadlines.

I missed the deadline! Can you re-open the application for me?
No. Applicants are expected to be fully aware of all important dates and deadlines.

Can I take the program on a part-time basis?
No. The MScPT program is only offered on a full-time basis.

Is there a January start date for new students?
No. The MScPT program only has a September start date each year.

Is it possible to transfer into physical therapy at U of T from another physical therapy program?
No, because of the unique structure of our curriculum, transfers are not possible into this program.

Are international students (e.g., students in Canada with a study visa) eligible for your program?
No. Applicants must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents at the time of application. This means that the last day you are able to update your status is the application deadline.

I should get my permanent residency by June, and the program doesn’t start until September. Can I still apply?
No. Obtaining permanent residency can be a long and complex process. In order to ensure that our class is filled with eligible candidates, we are not able to make exceptions to this rule. All applicants must have residency or Canadian citizenship by the application deadline.

I was educated in a language other than English or French. Can I take the IELTS instead of the TOEFL?
No. We only accept the TOEFL or the Academic English course offered by U of T’s School of Continuing Studies. For the minimum scores required, visit the English Proficiency Requirement section within our How to Apply page.

I am an internationally trained physical therapist/physiotherapist. Can I apply to this program?
No. Our MScPT is a direct entry to practice degree meant for applicants who have no physical therapy training. For information on obtaining a license to practice in Ontario, review the Physiotherapist Career Map created by the Ontario government. We also offer a Bridging Program, designed to provide educational opportunities for physical therapists educated outside of Canada, who already possess specified qualifications, to develop the additional knowledge, skills and clinical reasoning required to meet Canadian entry-to-practice standards.

How do you select who receives an offer to join the program?
Enrolment selection is based on a combination of CASPer exam score, reference letters, a general file review (e.g., academic preparation, prerequisites, reference letters, etc.), CAP exam score, and sub-GPA. The final ranking is based on 60% sub-GPA +40% CAP score.

What kind of students are you looking for?
We look for a wide range of well-rounded students from a variety of backgrounds and life experiences. Individuals who are self-confident, strong leaders, and who have strong problem-solving abilities will flourish in this program and will find this program a good fit. We accept applications from individuals with a disability or of aboriginal descent as well as those who hold graduate degrees.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, email physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

Academic Requirements

Is there a specific undergraduate program that is most suitable for admission to the PT program?
No. Applicants with a degree in almost any discipline are encouraged to apply. All programs are treated equally in the evaluation process. Regardless of your program of study, you will need to ensure that you have completed the prerequisite coursework, as detailed in the How to Apply section. 

What does “in almost any discipline” mean?
Applicants must have a degree with at least 75% liberal arts and science content. Generally, most degree level programs meet this requirement. However, certain programs such as degrees in the fine arts (e.g., dance, art, music, etc.) with practical components (e.g., studio, rehearsal, practice etc.) or theological degrees may not meet the 75% requirement. History courses in these subjects would normally be counted. If you are interested in applying to PT and you have this type of degree, we recommend that you take extra senior level (3rd and 4th year) liberal arts and science courses to demonstrate your readiness and fit for our program. There are exceptions so please consult with physther.facmed@utoronto.ca if you are unsure. Regardless of your program of study, you will need to ensure that you have completed the prerequisite coursework, as detailed in the How to Apply section. 

Is there a program that will best prepare me for PT?
We find that most of our students entering our program have a science background of some kind. Specifically, we receive many applications from kinesiology, biology, and medical science students. Regardless of your program of study, you will need to ensure that you have completed the prerequisite coursework, as detailed in the How to Apply section. 

I completed a three year bachelor degree program. Can I apply to PT?
Yes. Applicants should keep in mind that they will be competing against students with four-year university level bachelor degrees.

I completed a college level bachelor degree program. Can I apply to PT?
Yes. We will consider these degrees only if the degree is completed in full (or will be completed in full by our June 30 deadline) and provides appropriate scholarly preparation. A strong foundation in arts and science coursework is normally seen as a good indicator of appropriate preparation. However, applicants should keep in mind that they will be competing against students with university level bachelor degrees.

Do I have to carry a full-course load every year during my undergraduate degree to be eligible to apply?
No. Please note, the MScPT program is only offered on a full-time basis.

What university grades are required?
This varies from year to year. However, an A- average over your last 20 half-courses is generally competitive. See our admission statistics table for full details.

What will the GPA cutoff for this year be?
The GPA cutoff has been in the A- to A range for the past several years. However, since we base the exact cutoff on the applicant pool, we are unable to determine the cutoff until after the application cycle has closed. You can review our statistics on previous application years for historical data.

Can I email you my transcript for you to check how competitive my application is?
No. Due to the number of applications we receive and the resources we have, it is not possible to pre-screen applications. Applications (including transcripts) are only reviewed when we receive an official application through ORPAS. However, you can check the competitiveness of your application yourself by calculating your sub-GPA. Use the Undergraduate Grading System Conversion Table provided by ORPAS. Each grade counted within the calculation should be converted to a number on the 4.0 scale, and the average should be taken from those translated figures.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, e-mail physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

Prerequisite Courses

What are the required prerequisite courses?
Applicants are required to complete one half-course in human physiology, one half-course in human anatomy, one full-course or two-half courses in life and/or physical sciences, one full-course or two half-courses in social sciences and/or humanities and/or languages, and one-half course in statistics or research methods.

I completed a combined human anatomy/physiology course. Can I use this?
Yes. Combined human anatomy/physiology courses are acceptable as long as applicants have one full-course equivalent.

Can prerequisites be in progress at the time of application?
Yes, as long as they are completed no later than May 31. We normally need a final transcript showing completion of degree and all prerequisites by June 30.

What should my human anatomy course include?
Course content must be comprehensive, covering gross anatomy of the human musculoskeletal, visceral, and neurological systems. You can find acceptable human anatomy courses from across Canada at our Prerequisite Verification page.

What should my human physiology course include?
Human physiology is the branch of biology that deals with the normal functions of living organisms and their parts. The course should cover the principles of human physiology including the living cell, the internal environment; neuro-muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and endocrine systems; metabolism; reproduction; and homeostasis. You can find acceptable human physiology courses from across Canada at our Prerequisite Verification page.

Can I use a plant or plant/animal physiology course to satisfy the human physiology prerequisite?
No.However, you may use these courses towards the life/physical sciences prerequisite.

Can I use an exercise physiology course to satisfy the human physiology prerequisite?
No. However, you may use these courses towards the life and/or physical sciences prerequisite.

What are life and/or physical science courses?
Life science is the study of living things. Examples include biology, zoology, biochemistry, basic medical sciences, pathology, etc. Physical science involves the study of non-living systems. Examples include biomechanics, chemistry, physics, geology, physical geography, etc.

Can I use a human/social/urban geography course to satisfy the life and/or physical science prerequisite?
No. However, you may use these courses towards the social science and/or humanities and/or languages prerequisite.

What are social sciences and/or humanities and/or languages courses?
Social science is the scientific study of human society and social relationships. Examples include anthropology, political science, economics, sociology, psychology, etc. Humanities are academic disciplines which study the human condition, using methods that are primarily analytic, critical, or speculative. Examples include history, religion, philosophy, classics, literature/English, etc. Languages involve the study of spoken or written communication. Examples include the study of specific languages, including French, Spanish, Italian, etc.

What are Statistics or Research Methods courses?
Statistics is the practice or science of collecting and analyzing numerical data in large quantities. Research methods is the systematic investigation to evaluate data. You can find equivalent statistics and research methods courses at our Prerequisite Verification page.

Where do psychology courses fit?
Psychology courses can be used as a social science prerequisite only.

Where do biological psychology and exercise psychology courses fit?
Psychology courses can be used as a social science prerequisite only.

I completed my prerequisite courses more than seven years ago. Do I need to take them again?
Yes, they should be taken again. Prerequisite courses must be completed within the last seven years. For example, for the 2020 admission cycle, prerequisite courses must be completed between September 2013 and May 31, 2020.

I need to complete some prerequisite courses in the summer, after your June 30 deadline. Can I still apply?
No. Applicants must be able to forward a final transcript showing the completion of all prerequisite courses by June 30, prior to the September start date. Applicants not able to meet this requirement are advised to apply in the following year.

Can I combine two half courses in different disciplines to satisfy one prerequisite area?
Yes. For example, within the life and/or physical science prerequisite, it is acceptable to complete one half-course equivalent in anatomy and one half-course equivalent in chemistry. Prerequisite courses may be taken at any University provided the level of education is equivalent to or on par with the courses at the University of Toronto.

I did better in a third year kinesiology course that I think fits the life science category than I did in my basic biology course. Can I use the kinesiology course to satisfy the life science prerequisite? 
Applicants must have earned a minimum grade of B- (or 70%) in all prerequisite courses, as per the grade recorded on the transcript. If you earned a B- or 70%, use the basic biology course, as it likely meets our criteria the best. Grades you received in your prerequisite courses will not be counted as part of the GPA calculation, unless they are within the last 20 half-courses completed.

What does a full course equivalent mean at my school?
Universities across Canada often use different credit systems. Typically, a full course at the University of Toronto is equivalent to six credits (a full year course or two semester course), and half courses are worth three credits (half-year course or one semester course).

Can university web-based courses or distance education courses be used to satisfy the prerequisites?
Yes, this is acceptable, provided that these courses were taken at a recognized university. These courses must be considered equivalent to a regular university  level degree course. Some schools offer both degree level courses and non-degree level courses. Always check with the registrar at the particular school you are attending to verify that these courses are degree level, even if they are not technically part of a specific degree.

I completed my prerequisites at the college level. Is this acceptable?
Prerequisites completed at the college level will only be accepted if they have been transferred to a university transcript with equivalent courses and grades (or pass/fail) clearly stated on the university transcript. For example, Physiology 101 at College X is Physiology 1060 at University Y. The college level prerequisite course(s) cannot be grouped together as a batch of transfer credits on the university transcript. Additionally, it must be clear that the transferred course(s) covered the required content.  These transfer credits can be listed with a grade or as pass/fail on the university transcript however, they will not be counted as part of the sub-GPA calculation if they are listed as pass/fail on the University transcript. If the courses are listed as pass/fail on the University transcript, the mark on the college transcript must still be a minimum of a 70%. If college level courses are completed after finishing your degree and these college courses have not been officially transferred to a university transcript, then they will not be accepted towards admission prerequisites. Acceptability of college level credits towards prerequisites is at the discretion of the Department. 

How do I know if my prerequisite courses are equivalent to University of Toronto courses?
You must verify that your human anatomy, human/vertebrate physiology, and statistics/research methods courses will be accepted by visiting our Prerequisite Verification page. We do not list life and/or physical science courses or social science and/or humanities and/or languages courses because these categories are very broad and encompass hundreds of possible choices.

How do I enter a prerequisite course currently in progress in my ORPAS application?  
If you are currently enrolled in a course that you are using as a prerequisite, input the grade as “IPR” to indicate that the course is in-progress. Note: You must arrange for a transcript to be sent to ORPAS to prove you are enrolled in this course.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, e-mail physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

CASPer Test and Reference Letters

How many references do I need?
We require one academic and one professional reference. A third reference is not required. We do not give preference to applicants who submit a third reference. 

Who should be my reference?
We require one academic reference and one professional reference. Both referees should be individuals who can address your aptitude for studies in a health profession. Referees should also have direct knowledge of the applicant and should be in a position to reasonably make statements concerning the applicant’s character, communication and academic capabilities, and special circumstances if applicable. Additionally, the academic reference must be from the university level, such as a professor or course instructor. A common example of a professional reference is a supervisor in either a volunteer or employment setting.

Is volunteer work in a health care setting required?
No, but it is strongly recommended. Keep in mind that the only place for you to include such information is on the CAP. We do not collect any information on extracurricular activities or work experience within the ORPAS application.

Does my referee need to include a letter in addition to the ORPAS Confidential Assessment Form?
Yes. Instructions on what to include in the letter are on the ORPAS Confidential Assessment Form. Referees should write this accompanying letter on university/official stationary.

What is the CASPer?
CASPer is an online situational judgment test that evaluates personal and professional characteristics. You can complete the CASPer test on any computer with internet and a webcam from a location of your choice. The test consists of 12 sections and is composed of open-ended questions that measure soft skills such as communication, ethics, and empathy. You can learn more on the CASPer website

Do all applicants have to complete the CASPer?
Yes. All applicants must write the CASPer to remain admissible to the MScPT program. 

I wrote the CASPer last year. Do I have to take it again?
Yes. CASPer test results are valid for one admission cycle and applicants who wrote the test in previous years are expected to re-take it.

When should I take the CASPer?
The CASPer test should be completed between August and January of the application year. Specific CASPer testing dates for the University of Toronto MScPT program are listed on the CASPer website.

How do I make sure that you get my CASPer results?
You will need to include the MScPT program at UofT in your CASPer score distribution list to make sure that your score is sent to us. Also, you will need to ensure that you have included your ORPAS ID number in your CASPer account. We use the ORPAS ID to link your CASPer results to the rest of your program application. If you do not include your ORPAS ID number in your CASPer account, we may be unable to link your CASPer score to your application. This could result in your program application being disqualified.

What is an ORPAS ID Number?
The ORPAS ID number is provided to you by ORPAS after you submit your program application. You will need to include this number in your CASPer account. If you complete the CASPer after you submit your ORPAS application, include your ORPAS/OUAC Reference ID number immediately. If you complete the CASPer before you submit your program application, you will need to log in to your CASPer account and update it with the ORPAS/OUAC Reference ID number after submitting your application to the program. 

Should I take a preparatory course to study for the CASPer?
No. Taking a preparatory course is not recommended. Research suggests that coaching does not improve scores on situational judgment tests.

How do I prepare for the CASPer?
Book your test well in advance and familiarize yourself with the format and technical requirements. We recommend that you complete the sample CASPer test on the CASPer website

Do I receive my CASPer results?
No. Applicants will not be informed of their CASPer results.

Are marks considered more important than the CASPer scores?
CASPer scores are used as a first step in determining which applications will proceed to the next stage of the admissions process. CAP score and sub-GPA are both included in your aggregate admission score. 

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, e-mail physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

Calculating sub-GPA

How is GPA calculated?
We will consider your last 20 half-courses completed by December 31 of the application year, starting with the fall session of your current academic year and working backward. Due to the discrepancy in grade reporting across universities, in order to capture 20 half-courses, the sub-GPA must be calculated based on yearly versus term marks. Thus, where grades must be extracted from a year to achieve the equivalent of 20 half courses, the average of that entire year (including both the fall and winter terms) will be used. All calculations are based on the Undergraduate Grading System Conversion Table provided by ORPAS.

Is the GPA average from my transcript the same as the ORPAS sub-GPA?
Not necessarily. When calculating GPA, always use the Undergraduate Grading System Conversion Table provided by ORPAS. Each grade counted within the calculation should be converted to a number on the 4.0 scale, and the average should be taken from those translated figures.

What kinds of courses count towards the sub-GPA?
Only courses with a letter grade, numerical percentage grade, GPA, or convertible scale grade that were earned at the university undergraduate or graduate degree level are considered. Please note that the Admissions Committee reserves the right to refuse consideration of courses not considered eligible or comparatively equivalent to undergraduate degree study in the liberal arts or sciences. New for the 2020 cycle: For applicants applying to begin the MScPT program in September 2020, academic and research practicums will be included in the calculation of your ORPAS sub-GPA.

What kinds of courses do NOT count towards the sub-GPA? 
The following courses will NOT be counted towards the sub-GPA calculation:

  • Co-operative education courses
  • Courses with non-convertible grades such as pass/fail (i.e., no grade awarded; courses for which a “Pass” grade is assigned are not included in the calculations and courses for which a “Fail” grade is assigned will be included as a failure)
  • Continuing education certificate courses
  • Diploma courses
  • Sports performance courses
  • Visual, music, or dramatic arts performance
  • Naturopathic medicine courses
  • Chiropractic medicine courses
  • Many theological courses
  • Nil/Zero credit courses
  • Community college credits
  • Internships, vocation courses, and apprenticeships
  • Upgrading courses that are not completed at the senior level (see below for more details)
  • Consecutive Bachelor of Education (BEd) undergraduate degree courses 
  • Transfer credits from the college level that have not been assigned a grade by the university issuing the degree

*Please note that the list above is not comprehensive. The Admissions Committee reserves the right to refuse consideration of courses not considered eligible or comparatively equivalent to undergraduate study in the liberal arts or sciences.

Will the Physiotherapy Assistant diploma I completed at a college be counted within my sub-GPA?
No. We do not count any college level diploma courses. However, the content learned throughout certain college programs may provide you with some foundation knowledge relevant to our program.

I completed a Consecutive Bachelor of Education (BEd) degree after I finished my initial Bachelor degree. Will these marks count towards my sub-GPA?
No, we do not count Consecutive Bachelor of Education (BEd) undergraduate degree courses.

I completed graduate level work after I finished my initial bachelor’s degree. Will these marks count towards the sub-GPA?
Courses with a letter grade, numerical percentage grade, GPA, or convertible scale grade that were earned at the university graduate degree level are considered. The Department will update your sub-GPA if you have completed graduate level work; ORPAS only includes university undergraduate level courses in the sub-GPA calculation.

How are Pass/Fail or activity courses treated?
Pass/fail courses or activity courses (e.g., yoga, badminton, etc.) are not counted toward your sub-GPA.

Will summer or distance education courses be counted in my sub-GPA?
Yes, as long as they are at the university level.

Will my summer courses be counted separately or as part of my fall/winter average?
If you took eight courses or more in the preceding fall/winter terms, summer courses are counted as their own average. If you took seven or fewer courses in the preceding fall/winter terms, your summer courses are combined with your preceding fall/winter courses for one total average. For example, if you took seven courses in your second year, and then one course the following summer, the seven courses in the second year and the one course in the summer would be added together for one weighted average.

I’m in my 4th year and am applying for PT this year. Will my fall marks be counted within my sub-GPA?
Yes. We count all courses completed by December 31 of the application year. For example, for the 2019 – 2020 cycle, we will count courses completed by December 31, 2019.

How will you receive my fall marks of my 4th year?
If you are from an Ontario university, you should be using the Electronic Transcript Request form that is built into the ORPAS application. You will be asked if you have graduated or if you are currently in school. Be sure to check the “currently in school” option. This will ensure that your transcript is sent to ORPAS after your Fall marks are in the system. If you are from a university outside of Ontario, you have until late January to send a final transcript directly to ORPAS. Check our important dates page for exact deadlines.

I am currently in my 4th year, and by December 31, I will have completed 15 half courses throughout my 3rd and 4th years. How does ORPAS decide which courses to use from my 2nd year?
ORPAS counts the 15 half courses from 3rd year and the fall term of 4th year, plus they will take the average from your entire second year (fall and winter terms) and use that average for the five half outstanding courses. For example, if you have a 3.54 average in the second year overall, and we need 5 half credits from your second year, it’s like you received a 3.54 in 5 half courses. Note that this example can be applied to any academic year – if you took a fifth year, then the above example is exactly the same, except we would be taking the average from your 3rd year instead of your 2nd year.

I didn’t do so well in a course, so I took it again and earned a better mark. Will you take the higher mark?
It depends. If a course is repeated and both the original course and the repeated course are within the last 20 half courses, then the grades from both courses will be included in the sub-GPA calculation. If you did poorly in a course in first year and then took it again in fourth year, then only the fourth year mark would count towards your sub-GPA.

Can I check the sub-GPA that ORPAS has calculated on my behalf?
Yes, after receiving the application and all of the official transcripts, ORPAS will calculate a sub-GPA. You can check your Verification Report (VR) by logging into your ORPAS application. This report is available once your academic record has been reviewed by ORPAS, which will occur in February. The VR will present an up-to-date summary of all information contained in your application, including what transcripts and Confidential Assessment Forms have been received. It will also include the sub-GPA and a list of all courses/grades used in the calculation. It is your responsibility to check this report and contact ORPAS immediately if there are any discrepancies. Please keep in mind that if you completed graduate level courses, a college degree, or were educated outside of North America, the Department of Physical Therapy will perform a manual GPA calculation.

I completed a college bachelor degree. Why didn’t ORPAS calculate a sub-GPA for me? 
ORPAS only includes university undergraduate level courses in the sub-GPA calculation. The Department will calculate a sub-GPA for applicants with degrees from colleges. 

I need to increase my sub-GPA to be more competitive in the application process. What should I do?
Any upgrades completed should be at the senior (3rd or 4th year) level, unless they are prerequisite courses. Prerequisite courses are permitted to be at the 1st and 2nd year level. We also recommend that applicants take courses in the life sciences/social sciences/humanities, as these subjects are most relevant to the MScPT program.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, e-mail physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

Computer Administered Profile (CAP)

*New for the 2020 cycle: the CAP exam will be administered online.*

What is the Computer Administered Profile (CAP)?
The CAP is a written examination designed to assess personal characteristics and attributes, life experiences, knowledge of the physical therapy profession, and critical thinking/problem-solving skills.  The CAP is not a personal profile nor is it an MCAT-type exam for which you can study. Typical questions will explore understanding of the profession and ability to problem solve.

What is the format of the CAP?
The CAP exam is administered online. It is two hours long and features a series of short and long answer questions. 

How is the CAP used in the admission process?
Admission decisions are based on a combination of your sub-GPA weighted at 60% and your CAP exam score weighted at 40%. Please review our How to Apply page for full details.

When is the CAP?
Dates for the CAP are set in June of every academic year. We also have an alternate CAP day in order to accommodate religious observances and special requirements. You can find this information on our Important Dates page.

Do all applicants write the CAP?
No. The CAP exam is by invitation only. We typically invite the top 300-350 applicants to write this exam.

Who receives an invitation to write the CAP?
We first screen applicants based on CASPer score and then rank applicants by sub-GPA. Next, we conduct a full review of each application (e.g., prerequisites, references, etc.). Based on CASPer score, sub-GPA, and other components of the application, we select 300 – 350 applicants to write the CAP. Please review our How to Apply page for full details.

When does the Department send CAP invitations to applicants?
The Department will email CAP invitations to selected applicants in late March or early April. Please monitor your email account.

I received an invitation to the CAP! What’s my next step?
Applicants who are invited to write the CAP exam need to RSVP (with all required supporting documentation, if applicable) by the deadline stated in the CAP invitation. Please review the dates and details in the CAP invitation. 

How do I RSVP for the CAP?
Instructions on how to RSVP for the CAP will be provided in the CAP invitation. 

Is the CAP RSVP deadline flexible?
No. In order to ensure that you have access to the online learning management system through which the CAP is administered, we require your RSVP by the deadline indicated in your CAP invitation.

I have an examination that directly conflicts with the CAP exam. What can I do?
If you have received an invitation to write the CAP and you have a university exam that directly conflicts with the CAP, you will need to request special consideration to write on the alternate CAP day. You can request to write on the alternate CAP day when you RSVP. The link to the RSVP page is included in your CAP invitation. You will need to include documentation with your RSVP that demonstrates: 1) your enrolment in the conflicting course(s) and 2) evidence of the date and time of the conflicting examination. If you submit a copy of your timetable as evidence to show that you are enrolled in a conflicting course(s), please ensure that the timetable includes your full name.

I have an arrangement with my university’s Accessibility Services so that I receive extra time to write exams. Can this be arranged for the CAP?
If you have received an invitation to write the CAP and you require extra time, you will need to request special consideration. You can request academic accommodations when you RSVP. The link to the RSVP page is included in your CAP invitation. You will need to include documentation from the Accessibility Services office of your university when you RSVP. The letter must: 1) include your name 2) describe the specific accommodations you are granted during exams 3) be signed and 4) be written on official letterhead.

I have a religious observance or other extenuating circumstance that conflicts with the Saturday CAP date. What can I do?
If you have received an invitation to write the CAP and you have a religious observance or other extenuating circumstance that directly conflicts with the CAP, you will need to request special consideration to write on the alternate CAP day. You can request to write on the alternate CAP day when you RSVP. The link to the RSVP page is included in your CAP invitation. Please contact ptstudent.services@utoronto using the subject line PTCAP 2020, to determine what specific supporting documentation will be required to facilitate your request.

Can you accommodate my work, training, volunteer, or vacation plans?
No. The dates for the CAP are set in June of every academic year. Applicants will need to take the CAP dates into consideration when making work, training and volunteer commitments and when planning vacations.

I requested special accommodation when I RSVP’d for the CAP. What happens now?
If you requested special consideration, such as writing on the alternative CAP day and/ or asking for academic accommodations, the Department will contact you. Please monitor your email account as we may have time-sensitive questions.

Is there anything I can do to improve my CAP score?
Yes, we strongly recommend that you research the profession. You want to be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of what physical therapy is and why you are suited to this profession over other health professions. You should be familiar with the various roles a physical therapist has, the client populations they work with, and the different types of practice settings. You can find a plethora of physical therapy information online, including the Canadian Physiotherapy Association, the Ontario Physiotherapy Association and the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators. Your university career centre may also have information. Be sure that the information you gather is up-to-date. You can also consider visiting or volunteering in physical therapy settings to gain additional insight. 

Who marks the CAP exam?
Each exam is marked by three individuals: a professor, a current physical therapy student, and a physical therapy clinician. These three scores are averaged together to determine the final CAP score.

Do I receive my CAP results?
No. Applicants do not receive their CAP results.

What happens after the CAP exam?
Admission decisions are based on a combination of your sub-GPA weighted at 60% and your CAP exam score weighted at 40%. Please review our How to Apply page for full details. Please refer to the Important Dates on ORPAS to see when offers of admission are scheduled to be released. Applicants who receive an offer of admission, will be able to view and accept the offer by logging into their ORPAS account and following the online instructions.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, email physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

The PT Profession

What is Physical Therapy?
Physical Therapy is a professional health discipline directed towards the prevention or alleviation of movement dysfunction, and towards the enhancement of physical capacity. The ultimate goal of Physical Therapy is to assist the client/patient to achieve the highest possible level of independent function. Exercise, therapeutic modalities and consultative strategies are used to maximize function. In addition, physical therapists educate their patients and the community about the prevention of disabilities and promotion of health.

What is the professional status of Physical Therapy?
Physical Therapists are health professionals and are regulated by the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991.

Once I complete the PT program, can I start practicing right away?
No. PTs require a license to practice in all provinces and terroritories. Upon successful completion of the Physical Therapy program at U of T, graduates may apply to the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators to take this examination. To practice in another country, it is generally necessary to pass the licensing examination of that country/state.

What is the license examination like?
The exam is referred to as the Physiotherapy Competence Examination (PCE) and is administered by the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators, which includes both written and clinical components.

Is the exam free?
No. The PT Alliance charges a fee for administering the exam. For current fees, visit the PT Alliance handbook page and view the most current version of the handbook.

Is Physical Therapy the same as Occupational Therapy?
No. An Occupational Therapist is a health professional who works with people of all ages and conditions to help them lead satisfying and productive lives. Physical Therapists assist people with various physical disorders to overcome barriers to physical performance. The work of physical therapists’ focuses on decreasing the impact of disability and enhancing quality of life.

What’s the job market like in Physical Therapy?
The job market continues to be good. With the shift in health care from hospital to the community and private sectors, Physical Therapists are finding work today in many different settings.

Are all the jobs in hospitals?
No. Physical Therapists work in rehabilitation clinics, in home care programs, in community health centres/day hospitals, in schools, the workplace, and in various private practice settings. Physical Therapists are increasingly finding jobs as consultants and administrators, getting involved in research, and teaching in universities.

What does a new graduate earn?
Starting salary in Ontario begins around $50,000. Therapists in senior clinical positions between $55,000 – $60,000 and those at higher levels (e.g., administrators or educators) earn considerably more.

What’s the difference between a Physiotherapist and a Physical Therapist?
Nothing. The phrases are synonymous.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, e-mail physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

The U of T PT Program

What is the goal of the U of T MScPT curriculum?
The goal of our curriculum is to develop highly competent academic practitioners who will consistently demonstrate the essential competencies of a practicing physical therapist in a wide range of settings upon graduation. The Ontario Council of University Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences (OCUPRS) created a document, Essential skills and attributes required for the study of Physical Therapy/Physiotherapy, which contains information on the skills and attributes required for success in completing a university program in PT.

What is the curriculum like?
We utilized evidence-based learning in our program. Our curriculum is based upon the latest research and prepares graduates for practice in a changing health and social environment. Students develop their abilities to critically analyze and problem solve, integrating information from empirical and scientific literature and from practical experience. Through the integration of theory, research, and practice in every day of the program, students are able to render sound clinical judgments and to continually evaluate their findings and therapeutic approaches. Different teaching methods are employed in the Program (e.g., small group learning, case based learning, evidence-based practice, seminars, structured clinical session, and lectures).

What types of clinical sites are affiliated with your program?
There are over 200 exemplary and diverse clinical sites associated with the Department. They are acute general hospitals, long term care facilities, paediatric centres, out-patient clinics, rehabilitation centres, community care access centres, community services, northern sites, industry, private practices and administrative services.

What is your catchment area?
Our clinical education sites are located within the Greater Toronto Area and include Oakville in the west, Ajax/Pickering in the east and Barrie in the most northern area of the catchment. Our Clinical Partners page has a full listing of all affiliated sites.

What are some other reasons to apply to your program?
As part of the Faculty of Medicine, we have access to all of the resources of one of the finest medical faculties in the country. Being in a large urban centre we also have access to a wide variety of community settings for clinical internships and structured clinical sessions. Our own faculty all hold graduate degrees and are involved in research.

What is the philosophy behind the structure of the PT program at U of T?
The Master of Science in Physical Therapy Program is an entry-level to practice program. We are committed to the development of highly competent physical therapists who will provide patients with optimal health care. This competence will entail acting on the professional principles and general strategies embedded in the practice of physical therapy. Central to the goals of the program are the assumptions that graduates will become active consultants and leaders in rehabilitation and health care consultants in the health care system. They will be able to gather and analyze evidence, be consumers of research, identify professional issues, render sound decision-making, exercise good judgment and engage in evidence-based practice.

Graduates will practice in unique, complex situations and new and developing venues that demand insights and understanding of conflicting values and ethical stances in varied social, cultural and organizational contexts. They will be expected to develop confidence, competence and ethical sensitivity towards individuals and groups and demonstrate these attributes in the context of the varied health care delivery systems while assuming responsibility for their decisions.

Can I take the program on a part-time basis?
No.

Is there a January start date for new students?
No. The program begins only in September every year.

Is it possible to transfer into physical therapy at U of T from another PT program?
No. The unique structure of our curriculum makes transfers between programs impossible.

What kind of students are you looking for?
We look for a wide range of well-rounded students from a variety of backgrounds and life experiences. Individuals who are self-confident, strong leaders, and who have strong problem-solving abilities will flourish in this program and will find this program a good fit. We accept applications from individuals with a disability or of aboriginal descent as well as those who hold graduate degrees.

Can I speak to a current student?
Graduate and Life Sciences Education (GLSE) Student Ambassadors have generously volunteered their time to help make your MSc and PhD decision. They are also there to help current students transition into graduate school. These student ambassadors can answer your questions via e-mail or skype. (We may not always have a PT representative as this position is dependent on students’ volunteering their time to participate.)

What is the length of the program and what degree will I receive?
The Master of Science in Physical Therapy program is 24 months in length, including summers. Students can expect to be in classes or in clinic from 8/9AM to 4/5PM every weekday. Students will graduate with a Masters of Science in Physical Therapy (MScPT).

What is the graduation rate, licensure examination pass rate, and employment rate for your recent graduates?
Here is the “MScPT Program Student Outcomes” chart from the last several years:

Student Cohort Graduation Rate (%) Pass Rate of First Time Takers on Licensure Exam (%) Employment Rate* (%)
2014 97 94 100
2013 99 91 100
2012 96 91 100
2011 99 92 100
2010 98 96 100

*Employment data was collected by the Department six months after graduation through a graduate survey.

What is the cost of the program?
Fee information is available on our Fees & Tuition page.

Is financial support available?
Students may have access to a variety of funding sources to finance their education, including provincial loan programs, lines of credit, savings, part-time earnings, awards, and bursaries. For most students, it will be necessary to incur some debt, through access to government student assistance programs and a private line of credit with a financial institution. Visit our Financial Aid & Awards page (under the current students section) for specific information on the various funds available. Please note that we do not offer any entrance scholarships.

We strongly recommend that all incoming students apply for the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) or other provincial student loan programs. Students should apply for OSAP by June 30 so that loans are available by early September.

Additional financial information can be found at U of T’s Enrolment Services’ Financial Aid page.

If I am accepted can I receive help finding a place to live?
The U of T Student Housing Service can assist you in arranging housing. They are located at Koffler Student Services Centre, 214 College Street, Toronto. Graduate House a residence specifically designed for graduate students, may be one option you could consider.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, e-mail physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.

Doctoral Stream Rehab Programs

Is there a doctoral stream rehab program for Physical Therapists at the University of Toronto?
Yes, there are MSc and PhD programs in the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute. Students with a BScPT or MScPT may be eligible for consideration to this program. Alternatively, there are many other graduate programs available at U of T.

Why would a Physical Therapist want an MSc or PhD degree?
A PhD degree is required for researchers and educators in Physical Therapy, and increasingly an MSc is required for advanced consultant and management positions. Graduate study provides an opportunity to study in an area of interest in-depth and to contribute to the development of knowledge, theory knowledge and science in that area. For further information, contact the Rehabilitation Sciences Institute.

I still have a specific question. What should I do?
You should first review our How to Apply page and our other FAQ sections. If you still need help, e-mail physther.facmed@utoronto.ca or call us at 416 946 8641.