E-Module on HIV for Rehabilitation Providers in Sub-Saharan Africa

2015 World AIDS Day Press Releases

The E-Module was officially launched on December 1, 2015 in five countries:

Background

Treatment advances have improved survival for people living with HIV who have access to care. HIV disease is now considered chronic and cyclical, with periods of wellness and illness. As many people with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa are now living longer, they face health challenges related to HIV, concurrent health conditions, and side effects of treatment.

Screenshot of e-module header

A 2004 survey in Canada was the first to document the high prevalence of disablement among people living with HIV.  At least 80% of respondents experienced a minimum of one impairment (e.g. fatigue, pain, memory problems), activity limitation (e.g. difficulty carrying out daily activities) or social participation restriction (e.g. employment, financial independence) in the previous month. More recently, research has been conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa that illustrates the various forms of disablement that may be experienced by adults and children living with HIV.

These findings highlight the role for rehabilitation to help people meet the challenges of living and aging with HIV. But there was no comprehensive educational resource on HIV and rehabilitation designed for Sub-Saharan Africa. 

Purpose

This project developed an open access, online e-module to enhance knowledge about HIV care among rehabilitation providers in Sub-Saharan Africa. The goal is to better address the needs of the 24 million people living with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa.

This video was submitted to Grand Challenges Canada to seek funding from their Stars in Global Health competition.

Quick links

Adaptation Process

The E-Module developed in this project is adapted from the 2013 and 2014 Canadian E-Module.

The adaptation process involved 7 steps:

  • The 2013 e-Module was carefully reviewed by 20 experts in HIV, disability and/or rehabilitation in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • An outline for the adapted resource was developed based on reviewers’ feedback.
  • Content for the adapted resource was developed from text in the 2014 e-Module and new writing.
  • Drafts were reviewed by the research team.
  • The adapted resource was pilot tested with rehabilitation providers and rehabilitation students in Kenya and Zambia.
  • The E-Module was further revised based on feedback from the pilot.
  • The final E-Module was made available for free in online, mobile and downloadable PDF versions.

Research team

Acknowledgements

 New content for the E-Module was written by:

  • Stephanie Nixon, Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Director, International Centre for Disability and Rehabilitation, Canada
  • Cathy Cameron, Coordinator, International Centre for Disability and Rehabilitation, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Verusia Chetty, Lecturer, Physiotherapy Department, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • Saul Cobbing, Lecturer, Physiotherapy Department, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • Esther Munalula Nkandu, Senior Lecturer, Department of Physiotherapy, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Zambia
  • Sr Margaret M Mweshi, Lecturer, Physiotherapy Department, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Zambia
  • Joanne Potterton, Associate Professor, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa 

The following experts reviewed the Canadian e-Module to inform adaptation for Sub-Saharan Africa:

  • Folarin Babatunde, Physiotherapist, Nigeria
  • Alex Bugo, Rehabilitation Community Development Worker, Disability Service Programme, Kenya
  • Cathy Cameron, Coordinator, International Center for Disability and Rehabilitation, Canada
  • Verusia Chetty, Lecturer, Physiotherapy Department, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • Saul Cobbing, Lecturer, Physiotherapy Department, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • Theresa Gafna, Occupational Therapist, Kenya
  • Jill Hanass-Hancock, Senior Research Specialist, Health Economics and HIV/AIDS Research Division (HEARD), University of KwaZulu, South Africa
  • Sarah Mkenda, Lecturer, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical College, Tanzania
  • Stephanie Nixon, Associate Professor, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Esther Munalula Nkandu, Senior Lecturer, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Zambia, Zambia
  • Benard O. Nyajemo, Occupational Therapist, Disability Service Programme, Kenya
  • Charles Odira, Medical Assistant Clinician, Kenya
  • Carilus Okidi, Director, Disability Service Programme, Kenya
  • Thomas Okongo, Social Worker, Disability Service Programme, Kenya
  • Edwin Omondi, Physiotherapist, Homa Bay District, Kenya
  • Florence A. Omoro, Physiotherapist, Kenya
  • Onyango Omoto, Community Health Expert, Development Consultant (Baobao Consultants), Kenya
  • Eliza Owino, District AIDS/STI Coordinator/Medical Officer, Kenya
  • Joanne Potterton, Associate Professor, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa
  • Amanuel Tesfamichael, HIV Activist, Eritrea and Canada 

Graphic design

We are indebted to Catherine Nasije, Software Developer, for her outstanding work on graphic design and website development.

Acknowledging the pilot participants

We note the generous contributions of rehabilitation providers and students in Kenya and Zambia who contributed their time and expertise to provide feedback on the draft resource during the pilot testing phase. 

Funder

gccfundedbylogo-vectorGrand Challenges Canada. Grand Challenges Canada is funded by the Government of Canada and is dedicated to supporting Bold Ideas with Big Impact in global health.